Re: Machine language and assembler translators?

glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu>
23 Jun 2005 22:05:39 -0400

          From comp.compilers

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Re: Machine language and assembler translators? gah@ugcs.caltech.edu (glen herrmannsfeldt) (2005-06-23)
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[7 later articles]
| List of all articles for this month |

From: glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu>
Newsgroups: comp.compilers
Date: 23 Jun 2005 22:05:39 -0400
Organization: Compilers Central
References: 05-06-103
Keywords: translator

Jatin Bhateja, Noida wrote:




> My question is that are there any tools available which converts the
> machine language of one architecture to other architecture. For
> example if we have a got a complier for language say X and the target
> language of compiler is say for ARM. Now are there any tools available
> which convert or translate the code generated for ARM to some other
> architecture say SH.


(snip)


> [Both machine language translators and assembler translators have been
> around approximately forever. It's straightforward except for
> self-modifying code, and incompatible byte order and data formats.
> -John]


And that it tends to generate less efficient code then recompiling
from source.


The relatively recent popularity of JIT, just-in-time compilers
used by Java (and probably others) do just that.


When Apple started selling PowerPC based Macs the new OS included the
ability to run 680x0 code, using some type of run time translation.


For a slightly different way of doing it, many IBM S/360 machines
included microcode to execute the instruction set of previous
generations of machines. This allowed purchasers to run existing
programs while developing native S/360 versions.


-- glen


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