Re: Creating an interpreter for a Logo-like language on MacOS X

Erica Mackenzie <macfiddler@ozemail.com.au>
5 Apr 2003 15:11:04 -0500

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Related articles
Creating an interpreter for a Logo-like language on MacOS X macfiddler@iprimus.com.au (Erika) (2003-03-30)
Re: Creating an interpreter for a Logo-like language on MacOS X haberg@math.su.se (2003-03-30)
Re: Creating an interpreter for a Logo-like language on MacOS X cgweav@aol.com (2003-03-30)
Re: Creating an interpreter for a Logo-like language on MacOS X macfiddler@ozemail.com.au (Erica Mackenzie) (2003-04-05)
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From: Erica Mackenzie <macfiddler@ozemail.com.au>
Newsgroups: comp.compilers
Date: 5 Apr 2003 15:11:04 -0500
Organization: Compilers Central
Keywords: interpreter
Posted-Date: 05 Apr 2003 15:11:04 EST

On Monday, Mar 31, 2003, at 12:17 Australia/Sydney, Hans Aberg wrote:


> Erika <macfiddler@iprimus.com.au> wrote:
>
>> : - Which kind of parsing algorithm would to be most appropriate for
>> my
>> needs, LR, LALR, top-down, bottom-up, or which, how and why <g>?
>
> As you are designing your own language, it makes little difference
> what parsing algorithm you are using: These algorithms are different
> in the amount of grammars the accept, but say LALR plus the usual
> lexer/parser tweaks are sufficient for most "normal" languages. The
> problem arises if you have a given language, and it contains
> constructs that must be tweaked in exotic ways.




Thanks for your reply, Hans,


Actually, I'm not designing my own language; I'm at inheriting one
which is sort of cross between C++ and Logo, if you can Imagine that
<g>. it's called LogoMation:


<http://www.magicsquare.com/LM2/>


I'm attempting to port the IDE from Mac OS to Mac OS X, which
essentially means rewriting it in an Objective-C/ Cocoa. I don't think
there is anything unusual about the language; just turtle graphics,
list processing functions and the usual flow-control constructs. the
only slightly unusual thing I can think of is that it uses indentation
for demarcation of loops and functions instead of using punctuation
marks. I believe the language Python is also like this.


> LALR(1) ("lookahead LR") is a compacted form of LR(1), which combines
> different states on the expense of some grammar generality and error
> handling (when an error occurs, some extra reductions may be inserted
> relative LR(1)).


    Time to do some more reading...


        best,


        Erica Mackenzie
        Megalong Valley,
        N.S.W.
        AUSTRALIA


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