Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever.

david lindauer <dlindauer@notifier-is.net>
11 Sep 2001 23:16:29 -0400

          From comp.compilers

Related articles
Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. zuyihe@163.net (2001-09-03)
Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. mpointie@eden-studios.fr (MickaŽl Pointier) (2001-09-11)
Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. ralph@inputplus.demon.co.uk (2001-09-11)
Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. dlindauer@notifier-is.net (david lindauer) (2001-09-11)
Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. ceco@jupiter.com (Tzvetan Mikov) (2001-09-16)
Re: Looking for disassembler, decompiler, discompiler or whatever. vbdis@aol.com (2001-09-16)
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From: david lindauer <dlindauer@notifier-is.net>
Newsgroups: comp.compilers
Date: 11 Sep 2001 23:16:29 -0400
Organization: Compilers Central
References: 01-09-011 01-09-035
Keywords: disassemble
Posted-Date: 11 Sep 2001 23:16:29 EDT

"MickaŽl Pointier" wrote:


> The only exception was a tool on Atari ST called "Easy Rider" that was
> in fact a kind of interactive disassembler. It's the only tool that
> allows you to dynamically scroll through the disassembly result,
> change the content by saying to the tool "from adress xxxx to adress
> yyyyy this is binary data" or "this is assembly code"...


There is a DOS/windows tool called 'IDA' which is very similar to
this. It has easy navigation, label changing, modifying type of a
sequence of bytes, modifying constants to names, structure placement,
a scripting language to help you create programs that format/label
code or data sequences, and many many other features. It also
understands a wide variety of file formats in the DOS/WINDOWS world,
and the high-end professional (for sale) version will even
cross-disassemble a range of different processors, including common
8,16,and 32-bit processors. (There is info provided with the for-sale
version so that you can write a 'plugin' for any new processor that
isn't supported.)


The x86 support is pretty good since this is its native language;
about the only thing lacking is incorporating debugging info from an
executable. But it is rare to get that in the dos/windows world
unless you've made the code yourself anyway. IDA even has a
technology called 'flirt' that will allow it to identify a C compiler
run-time library (standard dos/windows libraries for various
compilers) and it auto-labels the various RTL functions so you don't
have to reinvent the wheel every time.


I think the author is heading in the direction of creating C code from
a binary, but not sure how that is going.


It is a very good tool. You can find more info at :


http://www.datarescue.com


also there used to be a freeware demo version on
http://www.simtel.net, but I don't know if it is still there what with
the reorganization that site has gone through recently.


David


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